Development Speed VS Quality

I’ve been working under some pretty insane time constraints lately. Two things jump out at me upon review of my work:

  1. I can, when cornered, churn out thousands upon thousands of lines of functioning code in a flash.
  2. The code works, but it is not particularly insightful or brilliant — it merely works.

The first bit is sort of cool: Typo Monster and Syntax Bear are no longer a part of my life (at least not in my Big Five). Nice.

On the other hand, the second bit isn’t so nice. It means that insightful development requires far more time than people tend to imagine. This has been a point of discussion for decades in engineering and especially software development, but its hard to fully appreciate until you get a chance to compare your own code, written once under duress, with code written for a similar problem domain at a pace that allows more time for grokness.

Now that I think of it, its not the pace exactly which is the problem, it is the way that certain forms of deadline and environmental pressures can re-tune the time budget in a way that extends typing/coding/input time at the expense of grok time.

This is particularly pronounced when it comes to data modeling — no matter if this means in the sense of managed state, a relational database schema, a no-schema blobbulation, a serialization scheme of some sort, or an object/class model.

This is a particularly touchy thing, since rearranging a data model of any sort entails major surgery when more than one thing relies on the way data is stored, but refactoring functions is relatively lightweight (so long as you understand what the intended mapping was to begin with).

I suspect that the vast majority of production code is written under deadline and that most of it relies on expedient and trashy data models. I further suspect that most corporate settings urge programmers to “be programming” and officially establish that “programming” means “typing” instead of “understanding”.

It is shocking to revisit something written in a hurry and simplify it in a flash of insight, and then contemplate what just happened. The surprise is all the more resonant once you fully realize how much less time is required to input insightful code than rushed, verbose-but-functional trash.

Looking to my left and right, it is not particularly evident that much production code benefits from a culture of sacred Grok Time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>